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Posts for category: Foot Conditions

By Foot First Podiatry Center
April 23, 2020
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Diabetic Foot Care  

Have healthy feet and prevent complications. Those are the goals of diabetic foot care at home and with the help of your podiatrist, Dr. Zahid Ladha. He and his team at Foot First Podiatry in New Albany, IN, watch over their diabetic patients and ask they be extra-attentive to their feet.

The importance of vigilance

People who struggle with diabetes know that the nerves and circulation in their feet and hands don't function well. Compound the problem with elevated blood sugars, and you have the recipe for infection and slow-to-heal wounds.

So, your podiatrist wants his New Albany, IN, patients well-informed on foot care. Of course, he'll see you in the office twice a year--or more often as necessary--to inspect your skin, nails, mobility, circulation and sensation.

But beyond that, you must take charge of your daily foot regimen at home, says the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). A little preventive care on your part will go a long way in keeping you mobile, healthy and happy.

Taking care of those feet

Really, it's just common sense. Your podiatrist recommends you:

  1. Visually inspect your feet every day, looking for areas of redness, friction and swelling.
  2. Wash your feet every day with warm water and a mild soap.
  3. Dry your teeth thoroughly and apply moisturizer.
  4. Cut your nails carefully--straight across--to avoid ingrown toenails and infection.
  5. Wear quality shoes with roomy toe boxes.
  6. Change your socks daily.
  7. Elevate your feet when you sit for long periods of time
  8. Get daily exercise.
  9. Avoid going barefoot, even indoors.
  10. See your foot doctor right away if you have a sore which does not heal, feel unusual pain or tingling in your feet or perceive a change in skin temperature or color.
  11. Keep a healthy weight.
  12. Manage your blood sugars and blood pressure.
  13. Never remove corns or calluses at home.
     

If you have diabetes...

It does not have to control you. Manage it and perform the foot care you need. For more tips proper ways to have your best podiatric health, call Dr. Zahid Ladha and his dedicated team at Foot First Podiatry in New Albany: (812) 945-9221.

By Foot First Podiatry Center
April 21, 2020
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Arch Problems  

The arches of the feet play a role in supporting your body’s weight when standing or in motion. The tarsal and metatarsal bones make up the arches of the feet, also receiving additional support and stability from tendons and ligaments; however, our feet, like the rest of our body, can be affected by infections, disorders, and structural changes that can impact not only the health of our feet but also our mobility. It’s important to recognize the warning signs of arch problems so you know when you to see a podiatrist.

Arch Pain Causes

If you are dealing with arch pain it is most likely caused by an injury or by structural abnormalities in the foot. For example, those with very high arches as well as those with flat feet may experience arch problems due to these common structural issues.

As a result, there are other factors that could also lead to further arch problems including:

  • Being overweight or obese
  • Aging
  • Plantar fasciitis
  • Cavus foot
  • Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction

It’s important to understand a little bit more about these common foot disorders and how they could affect the arches of your feet.

Plantar fasciitis

This condition that causes inflammation and microtears in the plantar fascia is also the most common cause of heel pain. Of course, because the plantar fascia (a ligament that connects the toes to the heel bone) also supports the arches of the feet this can also lead to arch pain. This condition is usually the result of overuse and is seen most often in runners. If you have plantar fasciitis it’s important to avoid physical activities until the fascia has fully healed.

Cavus foot

This condition, which affects the structure of the foot, leads to excessively high arches. People who’ve had a stroke, as well as people with certain conditions such as cerebral palsy may be more likely to develop cavus foot. This problem causes arch pain when standing or walking and can increase the risk for ankle injuries. Your podiatrist may choose to treat cavus foot through custom-made orthotics (shoe inserts), bracing, or by recommending specialized and supportive footwear.

Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction

The posterior tibial tendon runs from the calf muscles to the inner portion of the foot. This condition leads to changes in the tendon, which in turn affects its ability to support the arches of the foot. Flat feet can be caused by posterior tibial tendon dysfunction, and this is often the cause of flat feet that develop in adulthood. Like the other conditions above, treatment for PTTD usually involves bracing, orthotics, or providing custom devices that provide additional support to the arches of the feet.

If you are experiencing foot pain, swelling or other problems that affect mobility then it’s time that you turned to a podiatrist for care. Conditions and injuries that don’t respond to rest and at-home care may require more advanced treatments and therapies.

By Foot First Podiatry Center
March 23, 2020
Category: Foot Conditions

There are 52 bones in your feet and ankles, which means that feet contain about 25 percent of the bones in our bodies. Our feet also contain about 20-25 percent of the total joints in our body; therefore, it’s not too surprising to find out that your feet and ankles are unfortunately more likely to deal with tendon and joint pain at some point, whether through injury or certain conditions such as arthritis. When pain and other foot problems arise it’s important that you have a podiatrist you can turn to.

Common Causes of Tendon and Joint Pain in the Feet

Tendons are soft tissues that connect the muscles to the bones. Everything from overuse and foot injuries to structural imbalances can lead to pain. Common causes of tendon and joint pain include:

  • Tendonitis: inflammation of the tendon caused by injury or overuse
  • Sprains and strains: a common but usually minor foot and ankle injury, typically caused by physical activity
  • Arthritis: a chronic, progressive condition that leads to joint pain, stiffness, and damage (osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis to affect feet and ankles)
  • Obesity: being overweight or obese can also put excessive pressure on the joints and tendons of your feet and ankles, leading to pain and other problems

Treating Tendon and Joint Pain

Visiting a podiatrist is the best choice you can make if you are dealing with severe, persistent, or new foot and ankle pain. Since some conditions can get worse without proper care and rest it’s important to find out what’s causing your pain so you know how to effectively treat it.

If you are dealing with pain caused by a sports injury or strain it’s a good idea to see a medical professional so you know the extent of the injury. More severe sprains may require protective boots or crutches to reduce the amount of weight being placed on the injured ankle or foot.

Arthritis is also a surprisingly common cause of foot pain. If you notice joint pain and stiffness that affects functionality, range of motion and mobility in your feet then you could be dealing with arthritis. Since arthritis can get worse without treatment, it is important that you work with your pediatrician and a team of medical professionals to determine the best medications and course of action to help manage your foot pain and to prevent permanent joint damage.

If you are experiencing foot pain it’s important to see a qualified medical professional that can determine the best way to treat your symptoms. Call your podiatrist today for a comprehensive evaluation.

By Foot First Podiatry Center
February 18, 2020
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Heel Pain  

Heel pain is a common foot problem that podiatrists often treat. Knowing the cause of your pain is important in determining the most effective treatment method. Even if the pain heel painseems minor, it’s amazing how much it can affect your whole body, making it difficult to get out of bed let alone go on your regular run. If you are struggling with heel pain you might be dealing with a condition known as plantar fasciitis.

What is plantar fasciitis?

The source of your pain may originate in the plantar fascia, a tough band of connective tissue that connects your toes to your feet. If the fascia becomes inflamed, you may feel pain in your heel. Of course, everything from wearing high heels to long runs can actually irritate and cause inflammation within the plantar fascia. When this happens this is known as plantar fasciitis. This condition is usually the result of overuse and repeated stress rather than an injury.

What are the symptoms of plantar fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis causes heel pain that originates at the bottom of the heel below the heel bone. The pain may spread to the arches of the feet and may also be accompanied by stiffness. These symptoms are often exacerbated first thing in the morning or after long bouts of sitting or standing. Sometimes, light activity and exercise can momentarily lessen the pain.

How is plantar fasciitis treated?

If you know that you have plantar fasciitis (perhaps you’ve had it before) then you know it’s important to rest, avoid physical activity, and take over-the-counter pain relievers. Of course, if you’ve never experienced heel pain before it’s important to see a podiatrist to find out whether it’s plantar fasciitis or another condition such as heel spurs or Achilles tendonitis. A thorough evaluation from a medical professional is often necessary, especially if this is the first time dealing with heel pain.

Your podiatrist can also show you stretching and strengthening exercises that you can perform to help stretch the plantar fascia to reduce pain and discomfort. Some patients also choose to wear a night splint to reduce morning stiffness and arch pain.

If your symptoms aren’t being alleviated through conservative treatment methods or if you are experiencing chronic heel pain your podiatrist may recommend surgery.

If you are dealing with stubborn and painful heels turn to a podiatrist for a consultation.

By Foot First Podiatry Center
August 28, 2019
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Bunions  

Whether you suspect that you might have a bunion or our New Albany, IN, podiatrist Dr. Zahid Ladha has just recently told you that you have one you may have questions about this common foot deformity, your treatment options and whether you may require surgery. Here are some of the most frequently asked questions regarding bunions and treatment.

What is a bunion?

A bunion is a hard bump that typically forms at the base of the big toe, causing the large toe to lean toward the other toes. This causes the joint to stick out more and more over time. While a bunion can form on just about any joint of the foot it most commonly forms at the bottom joint of the big toe.

What causes bunions?

There is a lot of misinformation out there about what causes bunions and while we still aren’t fully sure what could cause bunions there are certain factors that could predispose you to develop bunions. These factors include:

  • Congenital foot deformity
  • Genetic
  • Foot injuries

If a member of your immediate family has bunions you are also at an increased risk for developing bunions too. Wearing high heels can make bunions worse, so you’ll want to avoid shoes with a heel that is more than 2-inches tall.

Will a bunion get worse?

A bunion is progressive, which means that it will usually get worse over time. Providing your feet with proper care will go a long way to slowing the progression. How slowly the bunion progresses will vary from person to person.

How are bunions treated?

The first course of action is usually more conservative, unless symptoms are serious. Those dealing with minor pain and discomfort will often find relief with simple treatment options including:

  • Taking anti-inflammatory medications to reduce swelling and pain
  • Applying a bunion pad over the area to prevent a callus
  • Wearing properly fitted shoes that don’t put pressure on the bunion
  • Splinting the foot to align the joint to reduce pain and stiffness
  • Wearing custom orthotics in shoes to provide cushioning for the foot

Will I need surgery?

If symptoms are severe, unresponsive to nonsurgical care and interferes with your daily routine then it may be time to talk about surgical options with our New Albany, IN, dentist. Surgery is usually the last resort when it comes to treating a bunion.

If you are dealing with foot pain or other issues and you believe that you might be dealing with a bunion then call Foot First Podiatry in New Albany, IN, today to schedule a consultation.